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The Tuileries Gardens are the oldest and largest gardens in Paris.
As you enjoy a drink or lunch in one of four bars and restaurants in the gardens, you can see a large number of works of art such as the Tree of Vowels by Giuseppe Penone, Reclining Figure by Henry Moore
Nymph by Louis Auguste Lévêque or Mercury riding Pegasus by Antoine Coysevox.
Situated between the Place de la Concorde, the Louvre and Rue de Rivoli, you can enjoy a walk or sit by the Octagonal Pond on one of the gardens’ 3000 chairs.
The children can have their moment of fun, too, playing with the sailing boats available for hire or, during the summer, taking a ride on a carousel at the funfair set up in the gardens.
There’s a lot of history attached to the Tuileries: The gardens owe their name to the tile kilns built by François 1st in 1519.
A few years later, Catherine de Médicis fell in love with the place and had the Tuileries Palace built, where great receptions were held.
Later on, Henri IV experimented with silkworm farming, growing white mulberry trees to launch silk production in France.
In 1664, on Louis XIV’s orders, André Le Nôtre redesigned the Gardens, which were extended with the idea of possibly creating the Champs-Elysées.
This was the birth of the Tuileries as we know them today; they became the leading public gardens in Paris at the time.
The Palace was abandoned in 1789 and became the theatre for a number of revolutionary scenes.
Several monuments were built, dedicated to certain great men, such as the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, built in 1806 as a tribute to Napoleon Bonaparte and his Great Army.
The Tuileries Gardens acted as a lung for the capital, which was redesigned partly as a result of the Gardens.
During the changes in regime, the composition of the Gardens gradually changed and works were carried out in the early 90s, in keeping with the style of André Le Nôtre.
To the east of the Gardens you can see the Orangery, which was originally used to house Claude Monet’s Water Lilies.
To the west is the Jeu de Paume gallery and the Terrasse des Feuillants.
The Tuileries Gardens attracts over 14 million visitors every year.


Video content: The Tuileries Gardens are the oldest and largest gardens in Paris.
As you enjoy a drink or lunch in one of four bars and restaurants in the gardens, you can see a large number of works of art such as the Tree of Vowels by Giuseppe Penone, Reclining Figure by Henry Moore
Nymph by Louis Auguste Lévêque or Mercury riding Pegasus by Antoine Coysevox.
Situated between the Place de la Concorde, the Louvre and Rue de Rivoli, you can enjoy a walk or sit by the Octagonal Pond on one of the gardens’ 3000 chairs.
The children can have their moment of fun, too, playing with the sailing boats available for hire or, during the summer, taking a ride on a carousel at the funfair set up in the gardens.
There’s a lot of history attached to the Tuileries: The gardens owe their name to the tile kilns built by François 1st in 1519.
A few years later, Catherine de Médicis fell in love with the place and had the Tuileries Palace built, where great receptions were held.
Later on, Henri IV experimented with silkworm farming, growing white mulberry trees to launch silk production in France.
In 1664, on Louis XIV’s orders, André Le Nôtre redesigned the Gardens, which were extended with the idea of possibly creating the Champs-Elysées.
This was the birth of the Tuileries as we know them today; they became the leading public gardens in Paris at the time.
The Palace was abandoned in 1789 and became the theatre for a number of revolutionary scenes.
Several monuments were built, dedicated to certain great men, such as the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, built in 1806 as a tribute to Napoleon Bonaparte and his Great Army.
The Tuileries Gardens acted as a lung for the capital, which was redesigned partly as a result of the Gardens.
During the changes in regime, the composition of the Gardens gradually changed and works were carried out in the early 90s, in keeping with the style of André Le Nôtre.
To the east of the Gardens you can see the Orangery, which was originally used to house Claude Monet’s Water Lilies.
To the west is the Jeu de Paume gallery and the Terrasse des Feuillants.
The Tuileries Gardens attracts over 14 million visitors every year.

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